Do not laugh at end-of-world predictions, says Pope Francis


Originally posted on Blithe Spirit:

This from Pope Francis on global destruction gives us a flavor of his worldview:

161. Doomsday predictions can no longer be met with irony or disdain. We may well be leaving to
coming generations debris, desolation and filth.

The pace of consumption, waste and environmental change has so stretched the planet’s capacity that our contemporary lifestyle, unsustainable as it is, can only precipitate catastrophes, such as those which even now periodically occur in different areas of the world.

The effects of the present imbalance can only be reduced by our decisive action, here and now. We need to reflect on our accountability before those who will have to endure the dire consequences.

He truly wants to save the world, lives in fear of the Apocalypse. Walking through the valley of the shadow of death, he fears evil in the worst way. Which coming from a Pope is scary, and I…

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Second-guessing sermons: Giving mystery its due


Originally posted on Blithe Spirit:

I do believe such second-guessing is a worthy pursuit, especially for former preachers who can be seen sometimes squirming in the pew. (He made his bed and lies in it, procrustean though it be.)

That said, I wonder if this 19th Sunday in Ordinary Time, cycle B, should be a time for considering ours as something of a mystery religion. I’d start with the reference in First Kings, 19 to the “broom tree” under which Elijah sat, pooped, after a day in the desert.

What kind of broom tree? Whisk? Push? Floor? Venetian blind?

I jest, of course. But the Sunday reading is often hard enough to grasp without having to deal with so odd, if helpful to Elijah, a protuberance.

As a preacher, I would pounce on this broom-tree business as one of many mysteries we are presented with in this thousands-of-years-old literature. I would make something of that, voicing my…

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Same-sex-attracted Roman Catholic priests, what about them?


Originally posted on Blithe Spirit:

I speak of percentages here. What per cent of RC priests are same-sex-attracted (SSA) compared to priests and other ministers of religion who have the marriage option?

Would RC ordination of married men or legitimization of a priest’s taking a wife — just one, until death they were parted — reduce said percentage?

Would such a change in RC customs reduce the influence of SSA priests and bishops in the councils and consultations of clergy members, as in undercutting support for SSA-friendly moral teaching and practice?

Loaded question that last, brimming with certain assumptions.

Such changes, of course are in no way guaranteed, assuming they are in order, the church being an imperfect institution, the Body of Christ on earth after all, not (yet) in heaven.

May I pursue these questions in later posts? I may just do that.

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Cincinnati murder by policeman. Some questions.


Originally posted on Blithe Spirit:

Questions after reading yesterday’s Cincinnati murder by policeman story:

1. Murder charge? Wow.

2. Mentality of 43-year-old man who refused to show license and instead handed over bottle of gin? In what society has he been living? With how narrow a frame of reference? How many of his background and experience would have gone along with the cop?

3. What is campus cop doing stopping a driver a mile from the campus? What is cop’s history? His demeanor pre-shooting with alleged murderous intent? He should have backed off as car drove away? Gotten out of the way? How was he caught in the door?

4. Dead man was acting like a damn fool but not damned enough to be shot?

5. Prosecutor Deters: First in hundred such cases he has handled in which he sought indictment. How does this differ from previous 99? Why this time? Climate of opinion due…

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McCarthy: Pastors, staffers prepared to deal with Supreme Court marriage decision – Illinois Review


Originally posted on Blithe Spirit:

McCarthy: Pastors, staffers prepared to deal with Supreme Court marriage decision – Illinois Review.

Frequent commenter to this blog Margaret McCarthy covers  Daniel McConchie, Vice President of Government Affairs for Americans United for Life, in a Grayslake IL presentation, including threats to conscience, including:

Here in Illinois, [where] Holy Family Catholic Church in Inverness is faced with a lawsuit over employment discrimination by Colin Collette because he was fired when he married his male partner.

In Illinois, we have had The “Illinois Right of Conscience” [as] one of the strongest protections for religious objections . . . successfully used to protect a Catholic pharmacist from civil penalty when he refused to supply a customer with abortificient drugs.

Currently, SB 1564 . . . passed and . . . before the General Assembly, would weaken those protections.

Chicago Tribune columnist and blogger Dennis Byrne gave us a look at this book in April…

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From destruction economic benefits? Not on your tintype.


Originally posted on Blithe Spirit:

Break something, pay to have it fixed, fixer uses fee to buy things, etc.? Not quite.

The Broken Window Fallacy and “Blessings” of Destruction in the Real World

  • Mises Daily July 14 2015
JULY 15, 2015Matt Palumbo

TAGS Booms and BustsHistory of the Austrian School of EconomicsPhilosophy and Methodology

In the early nineteenth century, Bastiat posed the story of a young man who throws a brick through the window of a baker’s shop. We’re told that this may have a bright side — that the baker must now pay a glazier to fix the window, who will then use that income to spend elsewhere, creating a ripple effect that benefits many.

Such thinking is reminiscent of what would later be used to justify the logic behind the Keynesian multiplier. Keynes would later write in the General Theory, “Pyramid building, earthquakes, even wars may serve to increase wealth.”

The Opportunity Cost…

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The human race , ala GK Chesterton


Originally posted on Blithe Spirit:

Makes you wanna keep reading, right?

The human race, to which so many of my readers belong, has been playing at children’s games from the beginning, and will probably do it till the end, which is a nuisance for the few people who grow up.

G. K. Chesterton, first line from The Napoleon of Notting Hill

Superfluous to comment . . .

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Founding fathers’ guiding light. Do Catholic leaders echo this?


Originally posted on Blithe Spirit:

The founding fathers quoted John Locke (1632-1704) more than any other non-biblical writer. A pungent sample:

It cannot be supposed that they [free people] should intend, had they a power so to do, to give to any one, or more, an absolute arbitrary power over their persons and estates, and put a force into the magistrate’s hand to execute his unlimited will arbitrarily upon them.

Arbitrary the significant word.

This were to put themselves into a worse condition than the state of nature, wherein they had a liberty to defend their right against the injuries of others, and were upon equal terms of force to maintain it, whether invaded by a single man, or many in combination.

State of nature: before government.

Whereas by supposing they have given up themselves to the absolute arbitrary power and will of a legislator, they have disarmed themselves, and armed him, to make a…

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Did Archbishop Cupich blow an opportunity to defend traditional marriage?


Originally posted on Blithe Spirit:

Phil Lawler, of Catholic World News, thinks so.

A contributor to the Chicago Sun-Times reports that he had a friendly exchange with Archbishop Blaise Cupich on the topic of same-sex marriage, and reproduces large chunks of that exchange for his readers. Naturally the archbishop says that he does not support legal recognition of same-sex marriage. Yet columnist Neil Steinberg observes: “To me, everything the archbishop said, except for his conclusions, is an argument for gay marriage.”

That sounds absurd, doesn’t it? Yet if you read the entire column you may find yourself hard-pressed to cite evidence proving Steinberg wrong.

The archbishop “thinks” this or that, sounding an uncertain trumpet. Timid.

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